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TOPIC: Wireless Spec

Wireless Spec 11 years 3 weeks ago #11341

  • apit
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hello there..
since wireless is quite wide user right now,we plan to setup new wifi at our college.the problem is, what is the good spec and any additional thing that we have to think before buy the product.

I've study some product and their technical spec.Below are the info:

Spec 1
-CISCO
-Proxim
-Juniper
-X-Lin(Hotware.com)
-Others recommendation

Which of the product is the best(for outdoor)?

Spec 2
Frequency range/Channel
-FCC
-ETSI
-Telec

Since we are at ASIA(not Japan), which one should we choose?

Spec 3
Modulation technic
-OFDM
-DSSS

If we want to use 802.11b/g, which modulation is the best?

Spec 4
Output power for :
*802.11b
*802.11g

What the common dBm for most product?

Spec 5
Antenna
-Omni
-Others

what is the best for outdoor unit?

Spec 6
Security:

* 64/128/152-bit WEP management
* WPA Support
* MAC address Access Control
* Others

Should the product have all the security method?

Spec 7
Other thing?

What else should we consider before buy the WiFi product?
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Re: Wireless Spec 11 years 3 weeks ago #11377

  • jwj
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1.) I've used Cisco WAPs and have found them to work quite well outdoors and indoors. I'm getting ready to deploy some Proxim WAPs are bridges, but this is a few months down the road. Can't comment on their performance yet.

2.) I wouldn't know who would have frequency oversight in Asia. Perhaps your country has its own organization? FCC is for the United States, ETSI is Europe, and Telec is for Japan. Whichever company you choose to order WAPs from will be able to help you with this, I'm sure.

3.) If you have a 802.11b/g WAP, then it will use OFDM for "g" and DSSS for backwards compatibility with "b". These are actually more like multiplexing than modulating. Example, OFDM at high data rates uses QAM = quadrature amplitude modulation.

4.) Your output power is found on a per channel basis. Different countries allow different amounts of channel as well as how much power can be used in the specific channels. Once again, something that can probably be best answered by whoever you are ordering the equipment from.

5.) If you go with Cisco, the make their own antennas, as I would imagine other vendors do. I don't have any experience with Omni.

6.) If at all possible, use WPA instead of WEP. You can really lock things down with Cisco WAPs, they support WPA2 w/AES (basically 802.11i), or use WPA w/TKIP, and don't forget 802.1x for MAC address control. You can have all your hosts that trying to get on your WLAN first authenticate through 802.1x through a RADIUS server that in turn can look up the user's information in Active Directory or LDAP.

As far as wireless security, there is lots of cool stuff out there. I'd recommend a wireless intrusion detection system. Thanks to Cisco's purchase of Airespace, they now have this technology. Another vendor is Newbury.

Anyways, my best advice is to get in touch with vendors and see what they have to sell to you. They'll get you a system that meets your country's standards and what you need.
-Jeremy-
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Re: Wireless Spec 11 years 3 weeks ago #11380

  • RedRanger
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CISCO WIRELESS ALL THE WAY! Prevents alot of hacking.
RedRanger

"I'd Rather You Hate Me For Everything I Am Than Love Me For Something I'm Not."

Be Awesome
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Re: Wireless Spec 11 years 3 weeks ago #11385

  • apit
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thanks a lot jwj..
your information help me alot..
do you think cisco aironet 1400(for outdoor) is the best for campus environtment(3000 user)?
6.) If at all possible, use WPA instead of WEP. You can really lock things down with Cisco WAPs, they support WPA2 w/AES (basically 802.11i), or use WPA w/TKIP, and don't forget 802.1x for MAC address control. You can have all your hosts that trying to get on your WLAN first authenticate through 802.1x through a RADIUS server that in turn can look up the user's information in Active Directory or LDAP.

what can i do if there are no LDAP or Active Directory at my college?
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Re: Wireless Spec 11 years 3 weeks ago #11391

  • jwj
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Do you have any sort of network login?
-Jeremy-
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Re: Wireless Spec 11 years 3 weeks ago #11406

  • apit
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yes..we have CMS
can we use the college content management system login?
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